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waterbums
    
RUST, how much is too much
I have a 62 Rambler four-door classic. Beautiful car runs like a champ. Only problem I can handle the rust on the doors etc. How do I know if I should pursue due to the rust on the floorpans and some of the unibody boxing under the floorpans and kick panels? This car sounds like a sewing machine running and is just wonderful. I just don't want to do a lot of work and have it really not worth much in the end.
Also, does there become a point where you D side to customize due to rust as opposed to restoring? Thank you for any help that anybody can be, I'm 53 and finally decided to simplify life with a more simple vehicle.
posted: July 30, 2014
 
     
 
  Answers (2)
 
retiredpartsman
    
THE FLOOR AND ROCKER PANELS ARE THE FRAME ON UNIBODY CARS. BEST WAY TO TEST PUT A PADDED JACK UNDER CENTER DOOR POST & CAREFULLY RAISE. IF DOORS GAP CHANGES CAR IS TO RUSTY. HAD ONE THAT THE FLOOR SPLIT AT 60 MPH,LUCKLY THE DRIVESHAFT IS CLOSED . ENGINE AGAINST FIREWALL KEPT CAR FROM BRAKING IN HALF .
posted:  July 30, 2014
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waterbums
    
That's funny, reminds me when I was a boy my dad bought a 64 vw beetle to commute. It sagged and the doors bound so dad jacked it up, welded a steel fence post down each side, then made a complete underside cover out of corrugated metal roofing and that old bug made a 27 mile one way commute for 3 years and when he'd hit a snow drift it would slide over it like a toboggan. Thanks for the advice.
posted:  August 5, 2014
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