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fay245
    
2 small pin holes in the top of my fuel tank on a 66 Pontiac tempest,what is the best way to repair?
 
posted: August 25, 2008
 
    
 
  Answers (8)
 
kadime
    
you could try something like JB WELD COLD WELD. it should be available at most hardware stores. i don't know if that is the "best" way though.
posted:  August 25, 2008
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spudder
    
That could be a sign of bigger problems. First, does the gas tank look fairly good and clean outside? Is the metal rusty on the outside? If not, then the tank could be rusting from the inside out, if thats the case you may want to seriously look at replacing the gas tank otherwise it is going to continue to develop holes and your fuel filters are going to start getting clogged with rust chunks of metal.

If on the other hand it is rusting from the outside, then clean up the metal as best as possible and go the JB Weld solution, should get you by for a little time...
posted:  August 25, 2008
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jakecr8n
    
If you want to do it right, you need to have it welded. Take off your tank(drain the fuel of coarse) and purge it. In other words, put air to it to so the fumes will dissipate. A MIG welder should be perfect for the job. If you're not picky about your ride, you know what to do. JB WELD
posted:  August 26, 2008
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kadime
    
I agree that welding it is the right way to do this but dont purge it with air. if you use air you are just adding oxygen to the gas fumes making it even more dangerous. to purge it, you need nitrogen.
posted:  August 27, 2008
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jeepster
    
If you don't want to live long - Weld it.... !! I wouldn't recomend anyone to weld a gas tank. Professionals will not do it so why should an amature. You have to fill the tank with CO2 to be safe enough to weld and most people don't have the equipment to pump and pressurize the tank with CO2 ..For the money - JB Weld it - If you have to pull the tank - you can take it to a professional gas tank shop and have it done right and internally coated ( mine cost $125 to have done) .. but I'd first consider replaceing it with a repop.. ... it's not that much money and in the long run it only adds value to the car. PS Tip - be sure to Rinse the tank ( new or rebuilt) before reinstalling.
posted:  September 2, 2008
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capnkelly
    
Repop. Two tiny holes on the outside could mean a lot of rust underneath on the inside.
posted:  September 19, 2008
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mke64
    
go to auto parts and get some jb weld mix it right and let sit 24 hours should fix it
posted:  September 24, 2008
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19cvy57man
    
You may consider having it fiberglassed inside an out by a professional tank repair company. Fiberglass is not compromised by the chemical properties of gasoline so therefore it is an excellent way tro repair a gas tank.
posted:  October 26, 2008
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